Recipe :: Mayonnaise

I tried making homemade mayo a few years ago and was relatively pleased with the results. I got a creamy, kinda yummy, soupy spread that sort of resembled mayo. Plus, it was only recommended to keep for a few days, and we just couldn’t eat it fast enough.

This spring, I discovered a recipe for mayonnaise in Sally Fallon’s Nourishing Traditions that seemed easy enough. {I’m telling ya – that book is so full of recipes I am convinced I will never have time to prepare them all! But, if you’re curious, here is a link to a blog devoted to doing just that:  The Nourishing Cook} And, since I’ve been making yogurt at home, I finally have a reliable source of non-flavored whey. I’ve made this recipe at least 4 times since February, and I’ve been very happy with the consistency, the flavor and the shelf life. Adding the whey extends the expiration date from two weeks to several months and makes the mayo thicker.

mtMyFjcqV79EaQGn_zj1NNQBecause I don’t care for the flavor of olive oil mayo, I usually prepare this recipe with half olive oil and half sunflower oil. Also, I use my immersion blender in the cup that it came with, and when finished, it fits perfectly in one of those Bonne Maman jam jars!

Ingredients:
1 whole egg, at room temperature
1 egg yolk, at room temperature
1 tsp. Dijon-type  mustard
1 1/2 tsp. lemon juice
1 Tbsp. whey (optional)
3/4 – 1 cup extra virgin olive oil or expeller-expressed sunflower oil or a combination
generous pinch of salt

Instructions:

  1. In the cup of an immersion blender, combine all ingredients except oil. Process until well blended, about 30 seconds.
  2. With the blender running, slowly pour in the oil.
  3. Taste and check seasoning. You may want to add more salt or lemon juice.
  4. If you have added whey, let the mayonnaise sit at room temperature, well covered, for 7 hours before refrigerating.

Enjoy! {OvO}

In the Garden :: April 27

2015 Apr 27 In the Garden

Things are coming along pretty nicely these days.

Our number one biggest success has been the garlic! I planted it in October and basically crossed my fingers. I was surprised not to find any scapes this spring, but the leaves seem pretty tall and full. Out of curiosity I went ahead and pulled “one,” but I actually had 3 little scallions. How did three grow instead of one?

The garlic!

The garlic!

The asparagus seemed to take forever to start growing but we harvested our first handful this week! A friend suggested uncovering the bed, that the straw might be keeping the ground too cool. I am so paranoid about weeds that I just couldn’t imagine taking it off, so in its own perfect timing, the asparagus came up anyway.

Asparagus grows at Owl Moon Farm!

Asparagus grows at Owl Moon Farm!

And now for our biggest failure in the garden. At least, so far. I know using a cover crop is a critical part of creating organic matter in the garden. I searched and read and decided to use Winter Rye; it seemed to be highly recommended. Problem is, what they don’t tell you, is that getting rid of Winter Rye in the spring is next to impossible, at least without mechanical assistance. It just doesn’t die. I’ve spoken with a friend, and found on a few “how to get rid of winter rye” discussion boards, that Winter-killed Oats would have been a better choice, sooooooo… At least I know what I’m going to do next year.

To get rid of the grass in my raised beds I tried cutting it back. I cut the beds with loppers. A few times. Turns out, Winter Rye is crazy resilient and grew back. With gusto.

After being cut. Twice.

After being cut. Twice.

I tried to cut it super short but only had really “dead-looking” grass after I left a heap of it on the bed. It seemed to kill the grass below it pretty effectively.

After being cut back and left to rot.

After being cut back and left to rot.

Dead spot.

Dead spot.

So a friend recommended digging and turning the soil to kill the roots of the grass. It was annoying, but not terrible. Here’s the bed above after being turned:

After turning today.

After turning today.

And here’s a different bed that was turned last week:

Turned a week ago.

Turned a week ago.

Takeaway: DON’T use Winter Rye in a raised bed, especially if you’re hoping to grow something early in the season without using mechanical tillage. I’ll be using oats next fall and will keep you posted.

Farm History :: Part 2

Recently, the kids and I (and my cousin and her family) visited the Frontier Culture Museum in Staunton, Virginia. The FCM is a living history museum, with exhibits that showcase the lives pre-Americans were living in Africa, Germany, England and Ireland. You can visit an African village made of clay, an English smallholding complete with a small herd of Cotswald sheep, an Irish village with a forge, linen loom and pigs, and finally, a rather large German estate with Red Devon cattle. Then, through the magic of modern technology, you are transported to a village made up of early American settlements, including one representing the Eastern Woodland Indians (not a specific tribe). I am eager to explore the 1740’s American settlement more as it is likely similar to what was built on our land when Rockbridge County was first settled in the mid-1700’s.

1740's Frontier Farmhouse

1740’s Frontier Farmhouse

I started my search for the history of the farm at the county’s government website and found this:

Rockbridge County was formed in 1778 and named after the Natural Bridge of Virginia, a natural historic wonder located in the southern part of the County. Two-thirds of the County’s 607 square miles came from Botetourt County to the south and the remainder from Augusta County to the north.

The inducement to settle the Rockbridge/Augusta area was provided in 1736, when Benjamin Borden received a Crown Grant of 100,000 acres with the stipulation that he would settle a hundred families [here]. Scotch-Irish [sic] and German pioneers soon migrated south along the Indian Road from Pennsylvania to settle in the area. Read more…

I did some more digging and was excited to learn the Logan family was a part of the initial Borden Grant filing. Unfortunately, the land {John} Logan settled in 1752 was a bit north of here, in the Walker’s Creek area. And while it appears his brother, David Logan, was already here as early as 1740, I have not found a map or any details showing that land. I have found evidence that his son, future General Benjamin Logan sold “800 acres on Kerr Creek” at some point. Our farm is not far from Kerrs Creek, but 800 acres…? If it was sold, then who bought it?

There is a large homestead between ours and Kerrs Creek which I believe to be the site of the Kerrs Creek Massacres, during which a Jane “Jennie” {Logan} McKee was killed, but I haven’t been able to connect her to either John or David Logan. Jane was born in 1713. John in 1703, David in 1706, and their third brother William was born in 1710. That would make her a cousin {?} but so far I have not been able to trace her family tree.

The previous owner of this home was able to trace the deed records back to 1825, so my hope is that between those records, the history of the county moving forward from 1740, and a conversation with a Logan still living nearby, I can figure out who and when this land was settled. Stay tuned! {OvO}

Scotch Collie History

Many of you already know our dogs, Kep and Finn, are Old Time Scotch Collies. However, it doesn’t seem I’ve shared what makes them so special to us.

We were extremely deliberate in choosing the farm dogs for Owl Moon Farm, and came across this breed in August, just after we moved to the farm. The wife of a colleague of Tripp’s has a breeding pair of these dogs, and is committed to reviving the breed. Old Time Scotch Collies {or, Scotch Collies, or Farm Collies, or Farm Shepherds} were once a dime a dozen. They are featured in agricultural works from 19th Century Europe:

Sheep Gathering in Glen Spean - Richard Ansdell 1872

Sheep Gathering in Glen Spean – Richard Ansdell 1872

Collies circa 1890

Collies circa 1890

And many, many photographs (and films!) from the early twentieth century in the US and the UK:

Collie helping with the sugaring - 1940

Collie helping with the sugaring – 1940

Beatrix Potter and her companion, Kep

Beatrix Potter and her companion, Kep

Known for their loyalty, biddability, and teachability, Old Time Collies were relied on for every job on the farm. They helped protect the livestock and children; they hunted rabbits, mice and other varmint; and of course, they helped the shepherd move his stock from place to place. They performed those duties in the Old Country, and the Scotch-Irish settlers brought them to the New World when they immigrated in the mid- to late-1800’s.

But, as the family farm started to decline, so did this once precious breed, and these well-rounded, dependable dogs were nearly lost. Luckily, there were a few breeders remaining in the late 1900’s that decided to rescue and revive the breed. There is a lot of history involved, so if you’d like to read more, I encourage you to visit Old-Time Farm Shepherd.

Our breeder was one of those folks that remembered having collie dogs around on a grandfather or uncle’s farm and committed to resurrecting the breed. Our pups are a result of that effort and we couldn’t be more pleased. Knowing that we are working side by side with a breed of dog that can likely be traced back to my own Scottish Highland ancestors…. Well, I get goosebumps every time I think about it.

 

Herding Instinct Test

Here’s a link to the video my son made during our Herding Instinct Test yesterday. I was so nervous leading up to it, but both boys really were phenomenal. Turn the volume up if you want to hear the trainer’s comments, or down if too much barking gets to you…

We tested at Keepstone Farm in Berryville, VA with all breed trainer, Susan Rhoades. We plan to do some more training with both boys and would love to take them to an AHBA trial or two this year. Stay tuned!

Farm History :: Part 1

When we were looking at the farm, the previous owner shared a lot of information with us about the history of the place. He told me that while this home has been here “since the 1800’s” there was a home here before that – which was burned in a fire. My number one itchiest question is –

Exactly when was the first home built on this land?

Once I figure out the answer to that one, I should have the answer to question numbers two and three – by whom and where exactly? Was it on this same homesite, or somewhere else? There is a spot labeled, “old home site” on the plat map that is at the very tippity top of our property line – who lived there and when?

After the family that farmed the land for generations (the Logans), the farm was used as an “artist community” (not a commune….?) and possibly a silk screen operation known as Inky Press in the 1960’s and 70’s. The property changed hands in 1984 and again in the late 1990’s, before finding its way to us in 2014. Since moving here I have spoken to the just previous owner extensively, the brothers who have been cutting hay off the pasture for nearly 20 years, and a woman who stayed in our rental cottage in the 1980’s. And fortunately, there is one living descendant of the Logan family living not far from here (he grew up on the farm); I hope to reach out to him this spring to collect his history. Along the way I have asked everyone who has photos or stories of the place to share them with me but so far, this is all I have found:

The farmhouse circa 1984

The farmhouse circa 1984

She’s come a long way, eh?

The farmhouse circa 2014

The farmhouse circa 2014

Event Calendar Added!

Now that we are starting to have on-farm events, I thought it was time to add an event calendar to the site. It doesn’t have much Owl Moon Farm stuff on it {yet!} but I’ve added some regional events that I thought were interesting. If you have an event to add, send the info to hello@owlmoonfarm.com.

Click here to view the calendar!