Community Garden

I just came across this link and it got me thinking – what a totally terrific idea! Set aside an acre or two and rent them out annually:

Background
Kinder Farm Park’s community gardening program consists of about 125, 20 * 30′ gardening plots. More than 100 gardeners rent plots each year for $40/plot to grow a variety of fruits, vegetables, legumes, herbs, and flowers. A program teaching eco-friendly and sustainable basic vegetable gardening skills to families is located at the Apprentice Garden and is sponsored by the University of Maryland Extension Office Anne Arundel County Master Gardeners.

The community gardening program remains a highly-regarded leisure-time pursuit for many of the park’s neighbors. The waiting list for plots has increased with each passing year. a recent resurgence of people cultivating home-grown food is sweeping the country. Both President Obama and Governor O’Malley have installed their own vegetable gardens in 2009 at the white House and the Maryland Governor’s Mansion, respectively, increasing news stories about gardening (with references to the famed “Victory Gardens” that were popular during WWII).

Community Garden

photo courtesy kinderfarmpark.org

Of course I have no idea what the demand might be, but it’s certainly something to consider! One of my greatest desires for this farm is a strong relationship with our community. I hope to grow a farm-to-school program and even a Heifer International-type program for local needy families. Knowing that our family cannot consume all the milk from even one single cow, I would like to start a Dairy Share program to help finance her upkeep, the milking equipment, and the time involved in caring for her and her calf. So many exciting opportunities – I’m still just trying to decide where to begin!

Animal, Vegetable, Miracle

We are due to finish up our first book club selection, Folks, This Ain’t Normal by Joel Salatin, and after a vote, we have chosen to read Animal, Vegetable, Miracle by Barbara Kingsolver next. I read this book a few years ago, shortly after The Omnivore’s Dilemma by Michael Pollan. AVM had come highly recommended from more than one good friend, so I knew I would at least like it. But when I discovered the author was writing about her family’s farmstead in rural Virginia, I knew I would love it. And love it I did.

It’s been a few years, and while this book certainly helped get me started down the path to homesteading, I look forward to re-reading it. I hope to find even more great information and ideas.Animal Vegetable Miracle Barbara Kingsolver

Become a Master Composter

NEW Master Composter Program

If you enjoy working with people, digging in the dirt and talking “trash”, we want you to become a volunteer Master Composter with the Athens-Clarke County Master Composting Program! Become a home composting expert and teach your family, friends, neighbors, and fellow community members, “How to Compost”.

Master Composters are an elite group of volunteers who have undergone an extensive training class in all aspects of the composting process, and then use that information to teach others how to turn their organic material into a beneficial soil amendment.

Master Composter Program Information Expectations:

  1. Complete the training course and field trips – (8 classes and 2 field trips)
  2. Complete class project
  3. Volunteer a minimum of 40 hours back to the program


Typical Volunteer Duties:

  1. Teaching or assisting staff with compost workshops.
  2. Staffing composting information booths at various public education and outreach events.
  3. Giving lectures on composting to various civic, community, and garden groups.
  4. Giving hands-on presentations or assisting staff with school compost programs


Program Details:

DATES: Tuesday evenings, January 10th – February 28th, 2012 including two field trips on Saturdays (February 11th and 18th) to exemplary commercial, farm, and residential composting facilities.

TIMES: 6:00 PM – 8:00 PM

LOCATION: ACC Solid Waste Department Administration Building Training Room, 725 Hancock Industrial Way, Athens 30605

COST: $100

TO REGISTER: Contact ACC Cooperative Extension at (706) 613-3640

FOR MORE INFORMATION: Visit athensclarkecounty.com/recycling or download the registration form here.

~ Special thanks to my dad for this awesome Christmas gift,
even if you do think it’s weird to love compost! ~

Garlic & Cayenne Oxymel

When I came down with my 2nd nasty cold of this season, I decided it was time to test my apothecary skills. While on our Ladies Homestead Gathering Retreat, we were honored to attend an herbal class with Patricia Kyritsi Howell of BotanoLogos School of Herbal Studies in Mountain City, Georgia. (You can check out her website at WildHealingHerbs.com) She brought along her knowledge and ingredients to make a few winter-time remedies for us. We discussed three remedies in great detail: Elder Rob Syrup, for use at the on-set of illness; Garlic & Cayenne Oxymel, to loosen a stuffy nose and soothe a sore throat; and Elderberry Wild Cherry Cough Syrup.

So last week I tried my hand at medicine-making and brewed a batch of Garlic & Cayenne Oxymel. And lest you fear I re-printed this recipe without permission, worry not! I cleared it with Patricia before publishing this. (As a new real-life blogger, I often forget to document my work as I go along, and thus, have no in-progess photos to share with you. My apologies…)

Garlic Oxymel

8 ounces cider vinegar
1/4 ounce each crushed fennel seeds and caraway seeds
1 bulb fresh garlic (approximately 10 cloves), pressed
3 fresh cayenne peppers
10 ounces honey

Put the vinegar in a pan with the seeds and bring to a boil, simmer for 15 minutes. Remove from the heat and add garlic and cayenne peppers. Let mixture cool. Strain back into pan. Mix in 10 ounces of honey. Warm over a low heat until thinned slightly. Store in a sterile jar in a cool place.

To use, take 1 tablespoon and dilute in 1 cup of warm tea. Drink as often as needed to clear congestion and soothe a cough.

Shelf life: Approximately 1 year.

My adjustments: I did not have any fennel seeds or caraway seeds so I omitted them. I did not have enough fresh garlic, so I used dried garlic. I did not have any fresh cayenne, so I used dried cayenne. But other than that…! It was delicious and effective, nonetheless.

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Hard-Working Mama

A few weeks ago we attended a wood cutting party at a good friend’s 60-acre farm in Madison County, GA. We spent the day using chainsaws, axes and even a gas-powered wood splitter to clear out a few downed trees on her property. By the end of the day, I had a pickup truck load of practically free firewood! So today I got out there and stacked it all while the kiddos dug around in the dirt.

Ready for winter!

Our first farm visit!

A couple of months ago I contacted a land owner via the VA FarmLink,

an online database designed to link farm owners interested in exiting agriculture with those seeking farms and farm businesses.  The database is the primary component to date of the Virginia Farm Link programwhich was established in 2001 by the General Assembly to provide assistance in the transition of farm businesses and properties from retiring farmers to active farmers.

I have contacted a few other farmers/land owners, but this was our first visit. We spent the holiday weekend with family in Chesapeake, Virginia, and headed up to Orange, VA “on the way home.” It made for an extremely long day, but it was an awesome opportunity.

Pros:

  • Lots of land
  • Flexible lease/ownership
  • Location – halfway between Charlottesville and Fredericksburg, VA

Cons:

  • The land is pretty chopped up, difficult to utilize
  • No hardwoods/timber
  • No useable buildings
  • No dwelling
  • Very far from potential off-farm job opportunities

Ultimately, we’ve decided this property is lovely but isn’t a good match for us.

Orange, VA Farm

Ladies Woodcutting Party

This weekend I spent a day with some great friends, on a beautiful farm, chopping wood. And even though almost every part of my body is in some degree of pain, I had a blast!

Our fearless leader had already spent hours teaching us how to use chainsaws and axes safely while on our Ladies Homestead Gathering Retreat, but we were eager for more practice. When she mentioned having a few downed trees on her property in need of removal, we jumped at the chance to help. I was pleasantly surprised by the turnout – over 20 adults and nearly 10 children! And, in LHG style, we enjoyed the most amazing pre-Thanksgiving potluck picnic!


Homemade Herbal Remedy Swap

If you have talked to me in the last month, you already know this, but I have become totally engrossed in the world of herbalism and natural healing. Ever since joining the Ladies Homestead Gathering (LHG) I have learned more and more about the power of plants and am determined to learn how to survive and thrive using just what the earth provides. The first thing I did was make a list of my top 10 remedies for the home first aid kit (based on what we tend to use most often):

  1. Headache/fever/pain reducer (to replace ADVIL)
  2. Antacid (to replace TUMS)
  3. Cough Syrup
  4. Something for minor skin irritations
  5. Something for major skin irritations (to replace Neosporin)
  6. Aromatic Chest Rub (to replace Vicks)
  7. Something for ear infections (afterall, I have two little ones)
  8. Something for a sore throat
  9. Something to relieve sinus pressure/pain/stuffy nose
  10. Something to relieve diarrhea

While I believe this is a practical list, I also think it’s a LOT to learn, and could be somewhat costly up front. I know a lot of folks out there have the necessary weeds growing in their very backyards, but due to our suburban location, useful weeds are rare in my neck of the woods. So, sourcing the herbs and supplies necessary for this undertaking would require quite an investment in a pound or so of each herb – which with this list could mean 20+ different herbs.

I mentioned my dilemma to Cyndi last week and told her I thought we could do this together to make it simpler (and cheaper). So, this holiday season, the gals at the Ladies Homestead Gathering are forgoeing the traditional “Cookie Swap” and are instead participating in our first Homemade Herbal Remedy Swap. At our last meeting, Cyndi passed around a sign-up sheet and two handfuls of women committed to making enough of ONE remedy for everyone else on the list. That means procuring the recipe, the ingredients and some kind of container so that when we come together for our Christmas party next month, those that participated will leave with a fully-stocked Herbal First Aid Kit. I can’t even begin to explain how excited I am about this!

Here’s what I’ll be making:
Simple Comfrey Salve  borrowed from Paganspace.net

Comfrey salve is a must-have for any herbal first aid kit! We use it almost every day chapped lips and elbows, dry noses, cuts, scrapes, burns, even as an under eye cream! Here’s a super simple recipe for comfrey salve recipe that you can make right in your kitchen. This salve also makes great gifts for friends and family. I like to put up big batches to give out at the holidays.

INGREDIENTS

2 cups good quality olive oil
~ 1 ounce (about two tablespoons) fresh comfrey leaves (or 1/2 ounce dried)
~ 1 ounce (about two tablespoons) fresh lavender flowers (or 1/2 ounce dried)
~ 1 ounce (about two tablespoons) fresh calendula flowers (or 1/2 ounce dried)
~ 1/2 cup beeswax

INSTRUCTIONS

~ Gently warm the olive oil and the herbs in the top of a double boiler for about 30 minutes. Stir frequently. It should bubble a bit at the edges, but not throughout the mixture.
~ Strain out the oil by pouring through a strainer.
~ Discard herbs and reserve oil.
~ Melt your beeswax in the top of the double boiler.
~ Add the strained oil and stir until completely blended.
~ Pour the mixture into jars or salve tins.
~ Once it is cool, label and date your creation.

I decided to get my herbs from Mountain Rose because their prices were good and I could purchase in less than 1 pound. quantities. I plan to double, triple for quadruple the recipe depending on how many women are participating. I think I should be able to get about 20 ounces from one batch, and would like to use 4 oz. containers, so 5 jars/recipe = ?? x Also, the Natural Health Encyclopedia of Herbal Medicine (Andrew Chevallier, FNIMH) recommends keeping ointments (those remedies which contain oils or fats heated with herbs and, unlike creams, contain no water) in a dark glass jar. So I’m going to get some of these. Again, still not sure of quantity though I don’t think I could have too many….could I?

And yes, if you’re my friend or my family and I’m going to be seeing you this holiday season, expect to get some too!

Book Club & Ladies Homestead Gathering

I was first introduced to Joel Salatin 5 years ago by Michael Pollan’s book, The Omnivore’s Dilemma. At the time, the concept of a local, seasonal diet was something I had considered, but never really explored. The chapters in the book devoted to describing Joel’s innovative grass-based farm were so inspiring, I haven’t stopped thinking about farming since.

A few months ago I started attending monthly meetings with the most intriguing group of women anyone should have an opportunity to know. Cindy B., the proprietress of Lazy B Farm in Statham, GA hosts, in her home, monthly Ladies Homestead Gatherings. Topics of discussion range from gardening, bread-baking, and wine-making, to chicken butchering, rainwater collection and herbal remedies – and that’s just ONE meeting’s agenda! After years of private exploration of my farm dreams, it is the most incredible blessing to have found this group of women that share the same goals!

Anyway, a few of us are reading Folks, This Ain’t Normal by Joel Salatin and we’re really loving it. After our first meeting this week we’ve pretty much decided the Book Club is a permanent thing and are already looking forward to our next title!

Folks, This Ain't Normal

Folks, This Ain't Normal, Joel Salatin, 2011

First Priority

After an inspirational weekend, I’ve decided to start fleshing out our farm plans beginning with our first priority: Weddings and Corporate Events.

I’ve been collecting photos for a while, so today I put them in an online album. Here’s the link And here’s a preview:

In his book, You Can Farm, Joel Salatin suggests we begin putting our farm plans into action immediately. Start growing and selling rabbits now if you have space. Bake bread, sew something, make applesauce; whatever you can do, do it now. I am still trying to figure out our first move in the short term, while at the same time starting to work on the big picture.

Once we find a suitable location, assuming there is at least a barn, there are certain improvements we will need to make:

  1. Restroom(s)
  2. Coat Closet
  3. Wet Bar
  4. Storage Area for chairs, tables, linens
  5. Prep Kitchen

I am in the process of collecting information about rates for events. I have a very good friend in the  hospitality industry who has offered to help me get started. In the beginning, we plan to rent most of what we would need to host an event, and purchase things a little at a time which will enable us to provide everything necessary. Due to the unique challenges of decorating the space, there are a few things we’ll need to purchase. Curtains and lighting are on the top of that list.